Tag Archives: invertebrates

Weekly Puzzler Answer #152

Hello and happy Saturday! Did you know last week’s insect?

It is a Click Beetle. Click beetles get their name from the slight clicking noise they make when righting themselves.

Check out this video of another kind of click beetle in Kansas, “righting itself.”

Did you know that BEETLES are the largest group of animals in the world? Or that their are MORE species of beetles on Earth than their are species of plants?? Scientists estimate that there are more than 400,000 named species of beetles (with millions more yet to be discovered!)

Beetles are different than other insects in that their first pair of wings is hardened and thickened to protect their fragile second pair of flying wings, which is folded beneath the hard covering. Their latin name, Coleoptera, means, “folded wing.”

Check out some of these beetles–when the light hits some of them just right, they look as beautiful as jewels!

Stag beetlePotato beetleJune bugFireflyFlower beetleWater beetlesGoldenrod soldier beetleSexton beetleOrnate checkered beetleMilkweed beetles matingDung beetleUnidentified beetleTiger-spotted flower lepturineJapanese beetleHercules beetleLadybird beetlesTiger beetleEyed click beetleBeetle on milkweedFireflyCommon eastern fireflyBlister beetleBeetle on milkweedLadybird beetleBeetleLadybird beetle

Here’s the next puzzler…have a great weekend! And Happy Father’s day to all of our Dad’s out there!

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Weekly Puzzler Answer #151

If you’re easily grossed out by insects with gruesome life cycles, this post might not be for you. The insect pictured in last week’s puzzler was a kind of Ichneumon Wasp, a parasitoid insect. In the world there are more than 24,000 species of ichneumon wasps(some sources cite more than 60,000); In North America, there are 5,000 species.

That VERY long “tail” at the end of the insect’s body is actually an ovipositor, or egg laying instrument. Females have dramatically long ovipositotm2-rs that are often much longer than the insect’s entire body.

The most amazing thing about this wasp in my opinion is its remarkable ability to locate a good spot to lay her eggs. To have success she must lay an egg INSIDE the body of another insect–be that the larva of a beetle, caterpillar, bug or other invertebrate.  She first lands on the outside of a tree, dead or alive, and uses her long antennae to feel the tree and listen to what’s under all of that thick bark. Amazingly she listens for vibrations to detect where a fat grub of a beetle is feeding deep beneath the bark. She then turns around and maneuvers her body into a position that allows her to drill into the bark and lay her eggs INSIDE the body of the grub. When the larvae hatch out, they feed on the grub, eating it alive from the inside out!

Yikes. I told you it was gruesome! Some kinds of ichneumon wasps select specific prey and some are more generalists. It can take a female over a half an hour to drill more than 4 inches into the solid wood of trees!

The wasp larvae will continue to feed on the grub or other insect larva until it is time to transform into an adult, at which time the host insect is dead or close to dying.

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A different species of ichneumon wasp laying eggs

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A giant ichneumon wasp laying eggs

Check out a video of this amazing wasp, laying eggs deep inside the bark of a giant tree, into the larva of a wood wasp:

Here is the next puzzler–another insect, but thankfully, without such a gruesome lifeclycle. See if you recognize it.

…and have a fabulous weekend! See you again soon.

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Weekly Puzzler #152: What BIG Eyes You Have!

Check out this striking insect. Have you seen it? Know what it is?

I was sitting in my sunroom recently when this insect landed on the hot tub steps. I ran out and shot a few photos before he flew off. It is only the third time I’ve ever seen one, though I suspect they are not uncommon–it’s just that there are a lot of insects and a lot of land for them to live in.

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Use the comment box below to give your guess. There are only two chances left before my next drawing–on the first day of summer. All correct answers will be entered! Good luck.

And enjoy your weekend!

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Weekly Puzzler #151: Really looooonngg “Tail”

Hello and happy weekend!

So yes, we’ve been talking a bit about insects. Let’s do another. I found this one the other day when I was in South Carolina at a lovely park called Jones Gap. Someone looking at this insect might ask about its very looooooonnnnnng tail? Stinger?

What IS that long thing at the end of this insect’s body? Is it a tail? And for that matter, what is this insect? Have you ever seen one?

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If you know the answer, or just want to throw out a guess, use the comment box below. We have just a few more puzzlers to go before the next drawing–June 21, for a photo prize. All correct answers will be entered in the drawing.

Enjoy your weekend and I will see you again soon.

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Weekly Puzzler Answer #150

Did you recognize the odd-looking creature in last week’s puzzler? It is a Cicada exuvia or shed skin. Some insects, like cicadas, go through incomplete or gradual metamorphosis. This means that they have 3 stages–egg, larva or nymph and then winged adult. Their transformation from larva to adult is extraordinary!

c-3586If you live in western NC and have been through Arden or Skyland in recent days, you’ve probably heard the deafening drone of cicadas in the treetops. And these are not your regular, ordinary dog-day cicadas, these are the amazingly long-lived 17-year cicadas or periodical cicadas.

Here is what they sound like.

Can you imagine living underground in the soil for 17 years? During this time you never see the light of day. You spend your time sucking sap from the roots of a tree, growing and sleeping. Sound fun? Imagine the changes the world can produce in 17 years! When I was thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail I came upon an emergence of the 17 year cicada. It was one of the most incredible natural moments I have witnessed. You can read more about it here. 

I used to think cicadas were had the longest lifecycle of any insect, but I have since discovered that is not true. They ARE the longest lived insect in North America, but not the world. Long-horned beetle larva, which live in dead wood, can remain there for 35-50 years before emerging as an adult. But they are not the longest lived either, amazingly! That award goes to the African queen termite who can live for more than 50 years, though some scientists suspect they live closer to 100 years. Imagine!! Such a tiny creature living so long.

Amazingly, scientists actually know where and when our periodical cicadas are going to emerge and have the broods named. If you live in the eastern US and want to know when a 17-year emergence will occur, you can put in your zip code on this site and see a map giving the locations.

There are also what people refer to as dog-day cicadas that live in these same places and have shorter life cycles. They are most likely the ones you hear towards the end of the summer. Their time underground in only 2-5 years, not 17! And they sound and look a bit different too. Some years ago I did a puzzler featuring dog-day cicadas, and then another featuring 10 things you may not know about cicadas.

That’s it for me for now. Have a good weekend. See you again soon!

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Weekly Puzzler #150: Sharp Claws and Big Eyes

Happy Saturday to you all! And happy Memorial Day weekend too.

I just want to give a shout out –and a big THANK YOU–to all of those people who came out last night to our 2nd annual blue ghost party here in western North Carolina. It was great to see so many people out on a Friday night anxious to learn about and view an insect! I was happy to get to meet some new people and see some friends I’d met years ago. Would you agree that nature lovers really are the best kind of people?

Thankfully many of “our” blue ghost fireflies were active and everyone who attended got to watch them moving through the dark forest for a little while. (Sorry, no photos as they are notoriously difficult to photograph–you will just have to make plans to experience them live for yourself one of these days) Later we went to look at the white sheet under the black light to see what moths we attracted–a small number of rather small moths mostly. (We talked about Luna Moths last night–here is what one looks like and here is what a tulip tree moth looks like. Also, here is a DAY-active moth you may have seen)

During the party I talked with several people about our next puzzler–an insect that has an amazing lifecycle, and, as many pointed out, an amazingly loud sound. Wow, a lot of these insects in one place can be deafening. This insect has the longest lifecycle of any North American insect. (But not the world. We will talk about the winner of that prize next weekend)

Check out these photos:

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Wow, look at those claws! What do you think it uses them for?

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Do you recognize this? Do you know what it is? Have you seen these in a forest near you? Or heard them?  If you want to guess feel free to use the comment box below. All correct responses will be entered in a quarterly drawing–the next one will be on the first day of summer–to win a prize. As always, check back next weekend to learn the answer to the puzzler.

Have a fabulous weekend! I hope you make some time to get outside–it’s a wonderful time of year with a lot of things going on. See you again soon.

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What Ants and Farmers Have in Common

If you’re like most people, you probably only think about ants when they get into your house or find your sweet crumbs during your picnic in the woods. Ants are truly amazing creatures… for instance, did you know the average ant can carry 10-50 times its own body weight? Consider this for a moment–that’s like a 200 pound man carrying two large cars or 10,000 pounds! And they are fast too, able to run 300 meters per hour. Another amazing fact about ants is their relationship with aphids and mealy bugs. Did you know some ants keep livestock just like farmers?

Here’s a video you have to see to believe–ants tend their flocks, move them and even protect them from the rain. Imagine!

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